Wednesday, January 6, 2016

January 6, 2016 - Home


It’s that haven, that feeling of safeness.  It’s the feeling of belonging, of being able to finally stop for a moment and rest.  It’s the unspoken knowledge of protection--protection from animals, protection from people, protection from the elements.  It’s the feeling of familiarity, comfort, and warmth.  It’s the feeling of being your true self.  This is mine.  This is my lair.  Unspoken words for the most part, of course, but vigilantly enforced nevertheless.

Home is where the heart is.

It’s imprinted on our hearts and minds, and it’s hot wired into our instincts.  The need for “home” is something every person can feel from birth onward.  It’s a desperate longing, and once gotten, it is fought for tooth and nail to preserve.  It really is our sovereign territory, the one place where we truly rule.  All other rules and laws in our society are automatically secondary to those we make for our own home.  This is an understanding we come to, and it’s very important to grasp this because this is where the idea of true freedom is born--in the idea of “home.”

When we are out and about in the “King’s Land,” our attitude and feelings are automatically different.  We don’t have to consciously adjust to the King’s rule; we do it automatically.  Here the law of the land prevails.  Here we are only one citizen among countless.  Here we are subjects.  But as soon as we cross the threshold of our own home--the very moment we step one foot across--everything changes.  Again, it’s automatic.  Now we are back in our own territory, and our thoughts, feelings, and actions adjust accordingly.  Now we are free to plan and be creative.  This is what “home” does.

The idea of “home” is much larger than any house could ever be.  It is a monumentally ingrained concept, and this is why every person is born with a deep yearning for a home, a deep yearning that ultimately equates with freedom.  It is an organized anarchy, the natural state of the human being.  It is our true nature, and our highly structured societies make the yearning that much stronger--to an almost unbearable point.  It’s the yearning for our own kingdom, our own line in the sand, our own freedom.  This is “home.”

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